Ep 162: Could You Handle an Emotional Teen? (What If It’s Your Son?)

Episode Summary

Andrew Reiner, author of Better Boys, Better Men, explains the new rigid rules for boys and how we can help our emerging men feel secure in a masculine identity. Plus, tips on how to build emotional resilience in our male teens.

This episode will be released to the public on 10-31-2021.

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Show NotesParenting ScriptsInterview TranscriptGuest Bio

Full Show Notes

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Parenting Scripts

Word-for-word examples of what to say to your teen

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1. Explain the problem with suppressing emotion: 

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2. Help your teen recognize their feelings by connecting it to the physical:

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3. Trace a physical sensation to an emotion: (1 of 2)

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4. Trace a physical sensation to an emotion: (2 of 2)

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5. Challenge your teen to get comfortable being alone in public:

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6. Give your teen some perspective on being “dissed” by strangers: (1 of 4)

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7. Give your teen some perspective on being “dissed” by strangers: (2 of 4)

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8. Give your teen some perspective on being “dissed” by strangers: (3 of 3)

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9. Give your teen some perspective on being “dissed” by strangers: (4 of 4)

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10. When your son (or daughter) seems upset at the end of the day:

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11. Empathize with your teen to show them that displaying emotions is OK:

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Complete Interview Transcript

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About Andrew Reiner

Andrew Reiner is the author of Better Boys, Better Men. He is a writer and full-time lecturer at Towson University, where he teaches writing, men’s studies and cultural studies. His work as a cultural critic has led to regularly published pieces in the New York Times, NBC News, and the Washington Post, among others. He has also been a speaker to audiences of educators, administrators, and parents in the States and Australia. 

Andrew lives in Maryland where he spends free time with his wife Elizabeth and his ten-year-old son, stomping around the grounds of their home, together searching for Civil War relics and wearing out their neurotic Australian-shepherd dog.

Want More Better Boys?

Find Andrew on his website, Twitter, and Instagram.