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Finding Your Identity

Finding Your Identity

August 31, 2018 Podcast Episodes 0

Episode Summary

Paul Angone, author of 101 Questions You Need to Ask In Your Twenties, gets into a discussion about the process of finding your identity and discovering your unique “secret sauce” to bring to the world. The key is to push teens to take on increasingly more responsibility in their lives while also taking the right kinds of risks. Paul reveals exactly what parents should say to get the best results.

Full Show Notes

Who are you, really? How is it that you feel completely different but yet still in some ways totally the same as you did when you were a kid? What will you be like when you’re older? Teenagers are starting to wrestle with difficult questions about finding your identity.

These issues will really confront them hard during their twenties, when they’ll have to choose a career and figure out where, how, and with whom they want to live their lives.

But the groundwork for finding your identity is already in place during the teenage years.

So how can parents support teens during this process? Especially if you’re dealing with rebellious teens who want to do everything for themselves?

This week’s podcast episode, featuring Paul Angone, answers just that question.

He is often called a “leading voice to Millenials.” After studying young adulthood and the generational differences between Millenials and Boomers for years, Paul Angone started the popular blog All Groan Up — a place for those asking “what now?”

His new book is called 101 Questions You Need to Ask in Your Twenties (And Let’s Be Honest, Your Thirties too) and it is an insightful collection of wisdom about the big issues that young adults are wrestling with in their lives.

Paul talked at length about the process of finding your identity, or your “secret sauce” that you can bring to the world. The key is to push teens to take on increasingly more responsibility in their lives while also taking the right kinds of risks.

Then he reveals exactly what parents should say to teens during this process.

In this episode he goes into extreme detail, revealing additional specifics and strategies not found in the book. Paul Angone explains the in’s and out’s of engaging teens about finding your identity during this 43 minute episode.

The 22-minute public version is free to listen to, and the 43-minute extended version, packed with extra goodies, is reserved for site members. Log in or sign up to access everything our site has to offer!

Word-for-Word Scripts

1. Encourage teens who are afraid to fail

“When you’re afraid, sometimes you’ve gotta do it anyways. And sometimes that might be a sign that you need to do it. Like making a presentation at work, I have to do a lot of speaking. That fear never goes away. I think there’s this lie that some people just never get afraid jumping on stage. Well, actually, I think a lot of them still are afraid of it. I still am after all these years. It’s intense to get up in front of people. But I step into the fear. And I’ve started to realize that fear actually gives me more adrenaline and makes me come more alive and I’m actually thinking clearer because it’s like my life depends on it. So sometimes that fear can actually be a catalyst for doing something great.”

-Paul Angone

4 Scripts HIDDEN…

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About Paul Angone

An author, speaker, and humorist, Paul Angone is the creator of AllGroanUp.com, which has received millions of visitors from over 190 countries. He started All Groan Up in 2011 out of his Masters program in Organizational Leadership, where he focused his studies on Emerging Adulthood and generational differences between Millennials and Boomers.

He is the author of three books:

  1. 101 Questions You Need to Ask in Your Twenties (And Let’s Be Honest, Your Thirties too)
  2. 101 Secrets For Your Twenties
  3. All Groan Up: Searching for Self, Faith, and a Freaking Job!

Paul Angone grew up in Colorado and studied Communications at Westmont College and Organizational Leadership at Azusa Pacific University. He lives in Denver with his wife and three children.

Find Paul Angone on InstagramFacebook, and  Twitter.